Chimeras, Mosaics, and Other Fun Stuff

11 - 18 of 18 Answers

February 9, 2007: I recently read Natalie Dye's response to a question about chimera DNA. As A Crime Scene Investigator and instructor this piqued my interest and has me wondering about DNA as it relates to bone marrow transplants. Would a person who receives a bone marrow transplant essentially now have two potential sources of DNA, the original pre-existing in the body's cells and now another from the donor cells of the bone marrow?
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September 15, 2006: I was wondering how it is possible that I ended up with one ear lobe clearly attached, and the other clearly unattached. I have read all about the dominant gene process etc., but it never seems to address how you end up with one of each. This was first noticed when I got my ears pierced at age 5, in 1978. The lady who pierced my ears was one of the only people in the area who did ear piercing, and therefore had seen many ear lobes before mine, but she had never seen one attached, and one loose or unattached. She was very surprised, and I have always wondered about it, since to this day I have never met anyone else with two different ear lobes, at least not that I noticed.
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April 28, 2006: What does chimera DNA look like? Are chimeras and mosaics the same thing? And are there any changes in chimera DNA?
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March 3, 2006: I was wondering if you could make a baby with 3 eyes. Is that possible?
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November 30, 2004: 1) On the CSI episode about the chimera, there was a disease mentioned (or shown) that began with a B. Do you know what that is? And why were there swirled patterns on the suspect's back when the special glasses were put on? 2) In the chimera episode, the fact that the guy was a chimera was first established through a camera flash on the skin illuminating skin anomalies (potentially through radiation??). Why is this the case? Presumably the bone marrow donor would not have been subject to radiation?
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September 16, 2004: When I was a camp counselor a few years back, one of the campers had light hair and a green eye with lighter eyelashes/eyebrows on one side and darker hair and a brown eye with darker eyelashes/eyebrows on the other. Also the lighter side had more freckles. The hair on her head was not bi-colored exactly symmetrically, but pretty close. How is this physiologically possible? I've never stopped wondering and the girl said that doctors couldn't explain it.
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June 25, 2004: I read from an article that many bony fish which include Nemo, the clownfish, change sex throughout their life-spans. How does changing sex impact their DNA? Were they born with both X and Y chromosomes or somehow they were changed when the sex was changed?
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June 8, 2004: The other night on CSI they used a medical term (I think it started with a C) for a person that had two different DNA's. Have you ever heard of this?
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