Are there any genetic engineering studies being done to stimulate hair coloring in adults who are grey?

- A curious adult from Texas

September 9, 2004

There are some studies that have been done in animals, but for the foreseeable future, humans will have to keep using dyes for their gray hair. The risks of using any sort of engineering on humans right now is so high that any tinkering with our genes is only used in life and death cases.

I have always wondered what my kids might look like when my boyfriend and I get married. He is a white male, brown natural curly hair, and green eyes; he\'s adorable. He\'s one of many who doesn\'t tan well but gets a reddish tan tint to his skin. I

-A graduate student from Arizona

September 9, 2004

It is very difficult to say with any certainty what a child will look like -- basically we can only give what is most likely. I'll give you my best guess based on what you have told me along with some links to find out more.

Given your family background, it would be very difficult to predict what a child might look like but here is my best shot. Your kids would most likely have curly hair, darker skin than your boyfriend, brown or lighter colored hair and any possible eye color.

Hello, I am trying to understand more about the gene that is responsible for cheek dimples and chin dimples. I understand how a set of parents <i>Dd</i> and <i>Dd</i> could have a child that is dimpleless, but is it genetically possible for a set

September 3, 2004

Wow, you're really interested in clefts and dimples! As with most traits, there hasn't been much research on this topic -- money tends to go to study more health related issues.

From what I've read, it seems that there are separate cheek and chin dimple genes. One site even placed them on certain chromosomes -- cheek dimples on chromosome 5 and cleft chin on chromosome 16! I couldn't find any corroborating evidence for this anywhere, though.

I am an Asian Indian woman married to a white American. I recently lost my baby girl due to miscarriage. Since then one of the issues I have been grappling with in my grief is that I cannot visualize what my baby would have looked like. I have thic

-A curious adult from Ohio

August 31, 2004

I am so sorry to hear about this. I hope this answer helps.

It is very difficult to say with any certainty what a child will look like -- basically we can only give what is most likely. I'll give you my best guess based on what you have told me along with some links to find out more.

Can a couple (one with straight hair, one with curly) have one straight haired child and one curly haired, and one of the children has green eyes and the other blue? Both parents have green. Is this possible?

August 27, 2004

The quick answer is that it is possible for the couple you describe to have kids with blue or green eyes. (Although less likely, it is even possible to have a brown-eyed child.)

In terms of hair type, by the traditional sorts of theories that are out there, it isn't possible for a curly headed and a straight haired couple to have straight haired kids (or, by a strict definition, curly haired kids either!). Of course, genetics is always more complex than the traditional sorts of theories.

I have a 4 1/2 month old that has bright red hair. My husband has a dark complexion and black hair, but is freckled. I am a sandy blonde and a fair complexion and freckled. Our first son is blonde. But, our second is as white as cotton and red h

-An elementary school teacher from Alabama

August 26, 2004

I have a kid with red hair too and everyone asks, "Does red hair run in your family?" The question is made easier by the fact that my wife and I do have relatives with red hair and you can see red tints in both our hair. I can imagine how frustrating the questions would be without having an easy answer...

1. \"One of the most interesting questions still to understand ... is why did the wolf keep locked in its genome everything that was necessary to make a Pekingese to a Great Dane,\" said Elaine A. Ostrander of the Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Cen

-An undergraduate from New York

August 25, 2004

I can see how changing a wolf into a Chihuahua could make someone question evolution! However, this process can be explained by naturally occurring mutations and selection by humans.

Recent studies of the dog DNA sequence have shown that dogs were most likely domesticated from East Asian wolves 15,000 years ago or more. The appearance of the domestic dogs varies tremendously between different breeds. For example compare a tiny 1 pound Chihuahua to a 160 pound Mastiff or a Great Dane.

Now, what about wolves and dogs. Is the fact that dogs are closely related to wolves compatible with the theory of evolution? The short answer is yes, but the underlying reasons require some clarification.

I have a 4 1/2 month old that has bright red hair. My husband has a dark complexion and black hair, but is freckled. I am a sandy blonde and a fair complexion and freckled. Our first son is blonde. But, our second is as white as cotton and red h

I have a kid with red hair too and everyone asks, "Does red hair run in your family?" The question is made easier by the fact that my wife and I do have relatives with red hair and you can see red tints in both our hair. I can imagine how frustrating the questions would be without having an easy answer…

The quick answer is that it is very possible (obviously!) to get a redhead from blonde and black haired parents. I'll go into the details below but next time you get a question about this, maybe you could answer:

Are Native American Indians fundamentally Asians?

-A curious adult from Singapore

August 20, 2004

Most theories say Native American Indians migrated to the American continent from Asia across a land bridge around 11,500 years ago. Yes, this would, in fact, make the first Americans Asians.

Hi. I am a 28 year old female and I was wondering do females get their father\'s or their mother\'s genes? It seems like I am mostly like my father but I don\'t know -- can you help me with this?

-A curious adult from Mississippi

August 19, 2004

It is common to look more like one parent than the other, but that doesn't mean you only get genes from that parent. You actually get your genes from both parents. We inherit half of our genes from our mother, and the other half from our dad, so that we end up with two copies of every gene*.

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